Gilmore warns of No vote consequences

Gilmore warns of No vote consequences

Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore has said that Ireland will be "back in the eye of the storm" if voters reject the EU fiscal treaty in the upcoming referendum.

The Tánaiste has also rejected calls for the poll to be postponed until it is clear what the new French President Francois Hollande wants in any re-negotiation.

Mr Gilmore said the new French leader is not looking for any re-negotiation, but a coupling of a growth and jobs agenda to the document.

And he said there will be consequences if people vote No on May 31.

"If the Stability Treaty is defeated… it won't be business as usual," he said.

"A defeat of the treaty has enormous consequences.

"This country will be back in the eye of the storm on the first day of June."

But responding to Mr Gilmore, Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams said the Tánaiste is just promising more pain and hardship.

"Any sensible person knows that the whole of the European Union is going to be in the eye of the storm for some considerable time," he said.

"It's time we came out of the storm.

"We think that the last four years of austerity doesn't work.

"Eamon Gilmore promises more and more of this to come if we vote for this treaty."

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