Gilmore accuses SF of 'new low' after Reilly allegations

Gilmore accuses SF of 'new low' after Reilly allegations

The Labour leader Eamon Gilmore has launched his most stinging attack yet on Sinn Féin, asking the party "how many bodies are buried on this island" because of them.

Mr Gilmore's attack came after he was accused of standing by corruption.

Mary Lou McDonald accused the Health Minister James Reilly of "sharp corrupt practices", claiming she had a document proving he interfered in the selection of a site in his constituency for a primary care centre.

However, Mr Gilmore accused her of "having some neck" given the "amount of illegal activity and bodies" the party had been responsible for.

He said: "You come in here with your orders from Belfast to make your allegations.

"Make your allegation outside the House if you want to stand over it, but don't come in here swinging around your political allegations. You are dipping to a new low now."


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