Garda commissioner praised for Louth crackdown

Garda commissioner praised for Louth crackdown

The Garda Commissioner is being praised for efforts to crack down on crime gangs in Louth in the wake of the death of Garda Tony Golden.

Noirin O' Sullivan has ordered an extra 27 officers to be stationed in the county and has told the Emergency Response Unit to carry out checkpoints in the border region.

Garda Golden was unarmed when he was gunned down by a man who had previously faced charges for being a member of a dissident republican group.

Local former Special Branch Detective Richie Culhane has welcomed the step up in security and said he hopes it will last.

“I want to commend Commissioner O’Sullivan for this prompt response to what has been an unacceptable situation for some time now, the time has come to meet the criminal activity being perpetrated by rogue republicans in this area head on, and close down their operations of criminality, “ Mr Culhane said.

“I would also hope that this temporary measure will become a permanent fixture and that the Garda force would be increased in numbers over the next few months.”


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