Free GP care described as 'poorly disguised attempt to buy votes'

Free GP care described as 'poorly disguised attempt to buy votes'

Critics of free GP care have described plans for its extension as 'a poorly disguised attempt to buy votes'.

Yesterday's Budget pledged free doctor visits for children under the age of 12.

But medics want to see proof that the scheme is working for under the age of six before they add more children.

Dr Yvonne Williams is the spokesperson for the National Association of General Practice and she has said there are more pressing problems for doctors to tackle: "Yesterday’s announcement is a very poorly disguised attempt to try and buy votes very cheaply and it is simply a distraction away from the Minister’s repeated failures to fix the growing crisis in the health care sector,” Dr Williams said.

"GP’s deal with over 90% of the public, we have a very high satisfaction rate and we are a key part of the solution to solving the crisis in the emergency department and in the hospital sector.”

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