Foundation asks flood victims to get in touch

The Community Foundation of Ireland is appealing to people who have been affected by the devastating floods across the country to make contact.

The charity has raised more than €100,000 so far and is now contacting community groups, to let them know there is funding available.

Thousands of people are returning to their homes this week to assess the damage caused by flooding in recent weeks.

Community Foundation of Ireland CEO Tina Roche says that they are anxious to help older people and low-income families in need.

"The people that we want to apply to us particularly are people who are dealing with the elderly - very difficult. People who are dealing with carers," she said.

"If you're caring for somebody within the home that you can't move, what do you do? We're looking for people like that.

"People who are on low incomes - so organisations that are dealing with people on low incomes - and we'll look after those first."

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