Former Cork hotel considered for derelict sites register after fall debris narrowly misses passer-by

Former Cork hotel considered for derelict sites register after fall debris narrowly misses passer-by

A landmark former hotel is being considered for inclusion on Cork city’s derelict sites register, it emerged yesterday after debris fell from it, narrowly missing a pedestrian writes Eoin English, Irish Examiner Reporter.

The near-derelict former Moore’s Hotel on Morrison’s Island is one of several buildings in a block in the area, which are being examined by the city council’s conservation officer and its building control unit.

A file on the targeted buildings was opened recently and reports are awaited before the structures can be added to the register.

News that officials are moving on the former hotel came after chunks of plaster fell from above one of its second floor windows at around 11am yesterday onto the footpath just seconds after a young woman passed.

Macroom Cllr Michael Creed, who witnessed the incident, said she was lucky not to have been struck by the material.

“I was just walking up the footpath when I saw the thing falling,” Mr Creed said. “There was a girl walking just underneath, and she was gone about two feet when it fell.

“She didn’t hear it because she had earphones in, listening to music, but she got a desperate fright. When she turned around and saw what happened, she got a weakness. Myself and a woman helped her.

“It wasn’t the amount of rubble which fell — it was the height from which it fell, and the speed.”

Former Cork hotel considered for derelict sites register after fall debris narrowly misses passer-by

A traffic warden on duty in the area contacted the city fire brigade who cordoned off the area.

Council officials inspected the building and are satisfied there are no serious structural issues. They are also liaising with owner after a meeting on site.

FF Cllr Tom O’Driscoll, who came upon the scene shortly after the incident, said it was time for City Hall to take a more proactive approach to ensure sites like this can be redeveloped.

“This building has been closed for some time and certainly it is one of several sites in the city which have fallen into disrepair in recent years,” he said.

“The excuse of the recession blocking the redevelopment of similar sites is over now, those days are behind us, hopefully.

“We need to ensure that whatever planning issues may be preventing redevelopment of sites like this are dealt with.”

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