Fianna Fáil call for Government to step up efforts to deal with fodder crisis

Fianna Fáil will bring a motion before the Dáil and Seanad tomorrow calling for the Government to step up its efforts to deal with the fodder crisis.

The party are concerned about the impact of the shortage on farmers' mental health and the welfare of animals.

Agriculture Minister Michael Creed has allocated €1.5m for animal feed imports to help alleviate the problem.

Fianna Fáil's Agriculture Spokesperson, Charlie McConalogue, says the Government needs to do more.

He said: "The danger is that the Government doesn't provide the additional financial support farmers require.

"That will actually add to the mental strain many farmers are facing and it will put many farmers in a position where they actually can't find the finances necessary to buy the fodder they need for the next couple of weeks.

They (the Government) need to act now and provide that support now otherwise we will find a situation where farmers will struggle in terms of financial stress and also where the welfare of animals will be put in danger as well.

- Digital Desk


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