FDII: Sugar tax unfair on hard-pressed consumers

FDII: Sugar tax unfair on hard-pressed consumers

A body representing the food and beverage sector is warning the government not to introduce Budget measures that will add to the cost of the weekly household shop.

Food and Drink Industry Ireland said that such a move would depress consumer demand and damage the prospects for recovery.

FDII Head of Consumer Foods, Shane Dempsey, said that the industry cannot afford to take a hit in the Budget next Wednesday.

"We're very concerned about consumer demand and consumer spending in domestic grocery sector, which has flatlined over the last number of years," he said.

"We're asking the Government to ensure that they don't add to the cost of the weekly shop for hard-pressed consumers out there by any additional taxation measures such as the mooted tax on sugar and sweetened beverages."

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