Extinction Rebellion give letter to Govt deptartments on 'defining issue of our generation'

Extinction Rebellion give letter to Govt deptartments on 'defining issue of our generation'

Update: Extinction Rebellion activists have visited every Government department building to hand in a letter, signed by more than 200 academics in support of Extinction Rebellion’s actions.

“The Irish government is complicit in ignoring the precautionary principle, and in failing to acknowledge that infinite economic growth on a planet with finite resources is not possible,” the letter read.

“Instead, the Government willingly has implemented policies that allow greenhouse gas emissions to rise and biodiversity to collapse.”

Before leaving Leinster House, the environmental protesters unveiled a large pink boat, which was pulled by ropes through the city, before ending at Merrion Square Park, opposite the Taoiseach’s office.

This is the defining political issue of our generation

Protesters, young and old, held signs that read: “Rebel for life”, “The oceans are rising but so is Carlow” and “Time is running out”.

One protester, Megan O’Driscoll, from Trinity College attended the protest with the TCD Extinction Rebellion group.

“It’s definitely the most pressing issue we have at the moment, if we don’t do this there’s nothing left to fight for, this is the defining political issue of our generation,” she said.

“I’ve honestly only taken this up in the last few years, I’m not proud to say I didn’t get in on it sooner, but I’m definitely here to stay.

“I think I got more involved because there are more public events being organised and it’s become so accessible, which is what you aim for when you’re trying to get critical mass for a support for a movement like this.

“All of the complaints being made about disruption and traffic are going to pale in comparison to the type of suffering that’s going to happen if we don’t take action.”

The group’s “Rebel Camp” will be set up in Merrion Square Park, where some of the members plan to camp for the week.

Extinction Rebellion give letter to Govt deptartments on 'defining issue of our generation'

Earlier: 'Enough is enough,' say Extinction Rebellion protestors at start of week-long climate change protest

Extinction Rebellion protestors have gathered outside Leinster House as they begin a week-long series of demonstrations.

Extinction Rebellion protesters pictured outside the Four Courts in Dublin. Pic: Collins
Extinction Rebellion protesters pictured outside the Four Courts in Dublin. Pic: Collins

They are demanding that the Government takes urgent action on climate change.

Protestors marched to the gates of Leinster House this lunchtime dressed in black carrying a coffin with the earth lying on top.

Today marks the beginning of what the group says is a full-blown rebellion.

The aim is to shut down roads in central Dublin until government leaders take action on climate change.

Jane, a farmer who is among those who will protest for the week, said: "Enough is enough, carbon emissions keep going up, nothing is happening and our government is doing nothing."

Extinction Rebellion protesters carry a coffin with a globe on top outside the Four Courts in Dublin this morning.Pic: Collins
Extinction Rebellion protesters carry a coffin with a globe on top outside the Four Courts in Dublin this morning.Pic: Collins

Maria Arnold, of Extinction Rebellion said none of the protestors are planning on getting arrested, but she feels they have been pushed to the brink for far too long.

She said: "I don't want to be arrested, I don't even want to be here, I mean I want to be at home with my family, but we have tried everything, we have tried signing petitions until we are blue in the face."

However she feels like they have been pushed to the brink for far too long.

Paul McCormack-Cooney, an Extinction Rebellion organiser, said the group feels these actions are a last resort.

“We’re deeply sorry for the disruption, we don’t want to be doing this, we don’t want to camp out in the rain and cold, but we have tried everything else, this is the last resort,” he said.

“For the next week we’ll be undertaking more disruption around the city, shut down business as usual and engage that way.

“We’ll be doing a lot of public outreach, letting people know how bad the situation is, a lot of people haven’t stood toe to toe to how immediately it’s going to affect them.”

Earlier: Watch: Extinction Rebellion begin week-long protest with 'Funeral March'

Extinction Rebellion activists in Dublin have started their peaceful protest about climate change with a march from Heuston Station.

Their 'Funeral March' is the beginning of a week-long series of events in the capital, in support of other events at capitals around the world.


Earlier: Extinction Rebellion to begin a week of disruption to highlight climate emergency

Extinction Rebellion activists have said they are ready to be arrested to make their point about the environment.

The activists say they are also peaceful, and they simply want a better world for everyone.

The group is organising a series of demonstrations across Dublin today as part of a global movement calling on the Government to take radical action on climate change.

At 1pm, activists plan to march from the Gates of Dáil Eireann to deliver letters with their demands to four different Government Departments.

More than 150 Irish academics from a wide range of academic disciplines in TCD, UCD, DCU, UCC, NUIG, MU, TUD, QUB and GMIT, have signed the Open Letter in support of Extinction Rebellion's week of non-violent direct action.

They are demanding that the Government immediately stops the Shannon LNG Terminal, saying: ‘The Government must act in accordance with the scientific evidence and immediately stop the U.S. Fracked Gas Terminal in Shannon plus any other new fossil fuel projects in development.

"The next 18 months are critical for putting in place the policies that will move this forward rapidly. Climate change is already here, but the progress we make during the next decade will determine whether we avoid the most devastating future impacts."

The protestors plan to set up a camp in Dublin city where they will hold a series of talks, workshops and entertainment.

Spokesperson Dr Ciaran O'Carroll says they are sorry for the disruption, but the Government is to blame.

Dr O'Carroll said: "We absolutely understand the concerns but we feel that this disruption is necessary because of the Government's failure to act on the climate emergency.

"Many many people, including small businesses in Dublin and around Ireland will be impacted by the climate emergency as flooding becomes more prevalent which is going to be huge disruption, so we are hoping that a small bit of disruption now leads to less disruption in the future."

Dr O'Carroll would not be drawn on where their protests will be, but he said there is an open invitation for others to join them.

He said: "We don't actually operate a membership model, it's just anyone who agrees with our principles and values is free to join in with us and so this week we are hoping that many people see the way that we act.

"We are peaceful, we are trying to bring about a better world a safer world for everyone, especially our children, and want to join in with that."

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