'Every woman's nightmare' - Rapist admits two more attacks

'Every woman's nightmare' - Rapist admits two more attacks

A court has heard a serial rapist who stalked his victims has confessed to two further attacks on women after receiving psychological help in Arbour Hill prison.

Salman Dar, with a previous address at Abbey View, Ballyhaunis, Co Mayo, but originally from Lahore in Pakistan, will be sentenced next week.

Salman Dar was described as "every woman's nightmare" when he was jailed by the Central Criminal Court nine years ago.

He was a predatory and very violent rapist who targeted women - typically those with blonde hair – as they walked home at night in Dublin.

The computer science graduate arrived in Ireland in 2003 and was jailed for 15 years for attacking three women the following year.

Ten years on, he has now admitted two further attacks on women dating to 2004 – an attempted rape and a sexual assault.

His lawyers say that four years of psychological treatment in Arbour Hill prison prompted the confession.

They said that he will return home to Pakistan on his release.


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