European success for BT Young Scientist Award winner

BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition 2010 winner Richard O’Shea was awarded the Adene Special Prize for his work in the field of energy at the EU Contest for Young Scientists in Portugal last night.

O’Shea beat off stiff competition from students representing 37 countries, to win the award and a cheque for €2,500 at the Lisbon ceremony.

O’Shea’s project, entitled ‘A biomass fired cooking stove for developing countries’ won him the title of BT Young Scientist & Technologist of the year in January.

Following his success at the exhibition, Richard was invited to join a research team in Trinity College over the summer to explore variations of his work.

Graham Sutherland, CEO, BT said: “Richard is an inspirational ambassador for the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition, for his county and his country.

“Ireland has had tremendous success in Europe and Richard’s award follows on from another Irish success last year when John D. O’Callaghan and Liam McCarthy took home the overall EU title from Paris.”

Each year the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition winner receives the honour of representing Ireland in the annual EU competition. Over the past 22 years, Ireland has taken home the overall title 12 times, second position twice and third position on four occasions.

Next year's BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition will take place in the RDS, Dublin from January 12, 2011.

The closing date for entries is October 4, 2010.

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