Dwyer relatives meet UN officials to call for inquiry into 2009 death in Bolivia

The family of an Irishman shot dead by Bolivian security forces are meeting UN officials in Geneva today.

Michael Dwyer's relatives are expected to call for an inquiry into his death in 2009. He was shot dead by Police in Santa Cruz in Bolivia.

Officials claim he was killed in a hotel shoot-out along with two other men after a right-wing plot against president Evo Morales was uncovered.

Michael's family insist there is no evidence that he had been involved in a shoot-out. They will today present two reports that indicate the Tipperary native was shot in the heart.

The Dwyer family have accused the Bolivian authorities of concocting a terrorism allegation and of "stonewalling them at every turn".

Today's meeting is with UN officials in Geneva attached to Christof Heyns, special rapporteur on ex-judicial killings, to call for an inquiry into the 24-year-old Ballinderry man's death.


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