Dublin Gaelscoil forced to close again due to structural concerns

Dublin Gaelscoil forced to close again due to structural concerns

A Dublin Gaelscoil will have to close again due to ongoing repair works to fix fire safety problems in Tallaght.

Scoil Chaitlín Maude is expected to close for up to 18 weeks following concerns about the integrity of buildings constructed by Western Building Systems.

It is one of the 23 schools that have had to undergo work after serious structural and health and safety issues were identified.

Students will be moved to a school in CityWest while the repairs are carried out.

In a facebook post, the school said it was advised by An Roinn Oideachais & Scileanna to move the entire school to the current Citywest Educate Together school sometime in November, with exact dates to be confirmed in the coming weeks.

The school said: "There have been remedial works taking place here in the school for the past year.

During the summer, extensive fire remediation and upgrade works took place. However, there remains a lot of very disruptive work to be done.

They added: "As of now, we have no further details as to how this move will progress and we await information from the Department.

"As soon as we have all the details, we will organise a series of meetings with parents and guardians to discuss the practicalities of the move.

"This is obviously a huge disruption for the entire school community and will require a lot of cooperation between us all. "However, it means that all the works will be completed in the current school year and that will be the end of the various disruptions to the school."

The school said they are currently discussing how best to organise transporting children to and from school and that suggestions from parents will be appreciated.

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