Dublin commuters spend 14 days every year behind the wheel driving to work

Dublin commuters spend 14 days every year behind the wheel driving to work

A survey carried out by easytrip, the electronic parking and tolling tag provider, has revealed that Irish motorists are losing 14 days on average per year commuting into Dublin's city centre.

Respondents to the survey also believe that the proposed changes to the traffic flow on the north and south quays would see this figure increase by an additional 10 days annually equating to a total of 24 days a year in the car.

Of those surveyed 81% commuted to Dublin city centre by car with 73% stating that the proposed Dublin quays traffic flow system will affect them.

The survey also highlighted their concern for cyclists on the same route.

Dublin commuters spend 14 days every year behind the wheel driving to work

More than 50% also highlighting that the changes would deter them from driving into the city.

The proposed changes may affect retail in Dublin with 62% of those surveyed said that the proposed changes to the traffic on the quays would affect their decision to shop in Dublin city centre.

Commenting on the survey, Colin Delaney, CEO of easytrip Ireland said: “We carried out this survey to find out what impact the proposed changes to the traffic flow on the quays would have and our survey has clearly revealed that these changes will affect drivers and have a significant impact on retailers also.”

“Driving into the city centre is the quickest option for many commuters, in particular, as the current public transport network isn’t suitable for their requirements.

"It’s alarming to see that city commuting times total 14 days each year using a car, the mode of transport perceived to be the most efficient option by those surveyed," he said.

"14 days is too much and it would be absurd to impose longer travel times on stretched Dublin commuters at a time when the public transport infrastructure required to create an efficient, vibrant city centre, is not in place,” Mr Delaney added.

1,500 people were surveyed with respondents based in Dublin and surrounding commuter belt including Co Kildare and Co Wicklow.

On average commuters spend approximately 43 minutes each way on their daily commute to Dublin. This is averaged out over a year equating to 14 days behind the wheel on the commute to work.

On average commuters said that the proposed changes would add 32 minutes in addition to the 43 minutes each way on their daily commute to Dublin city. This is averaged out over a year equating to an additional 10 days behind the wheel on the commute to work.


More in this Section

Man dies after being struck near Kildare on M7 last nightMan dies after being struck near Kildare on M7 last night

Warnings of heavy rainfall and damaging gales from Cork to Donegal as Storm Atiyah passesWarnings of heavy rainfall and damaging gales from Cork to Donegal as Storm Atiyah passes

Just in time for Christmas - ONE winner of €6.8m LottoJust in time for Christmas - ONE winner of €6.8m Lotto

Man killed in crash between lorry and carMan killed in crash between lorry and car


Lifestyle

Overshadowed by its giant neighbours it may be, but the smallest of the main Blasket islands, Beginish, is no less impressive in its own right.The Islands of Ireland: The miracle of Beginish

‘The days of our years are threescore years and ten — Psalm 90How to tell an animal’s age in a heartbeat

We often hear how nature will do well, even come back from the brink of extinction, if given a chance and some human help.Birds of prey on the rise

In our country we still have places that bear no evidence of disturbance by man, that are in their pristine state and rich with all the elements that feed the spirit and deliver us into the world beyond the skin of the time and circumstances we live in.Unique ambience of Dursey Island under threat

More From The Irish Examiner