Dublin City Council to evict up to 50 social housing tenants who are in arrears

Dublin City Council to evict up to 50 social housing tenants who are in arrears

Dublin City Council is moving to evict up to 50 social housing tenants who have failed to pay rent.

It says more and more tenants have gone into arrears in recent years, and it plans to take "more forceful action" to tackle the issue.

The council says there is "no question of a soft approach", and says it is going to take the cases to court as a last resort.

Three in five council tenants are in arrears which amount to €31m.

40% of those in arrears owe less than €500 euro and fall into this category as soon as they are a week behind.

Another quarter owe less than €2,000 and just over a fifth owe between €2,000 and €7,000.

Councillor Christy Burke says debts rack up for all sorts of reasons.

Cllr Burke said that any council tenants in arrears should try and settle up.

"When it comes to court, people are inclined to panic and they run and they take desperate measures for desperate situations," he said.

"Do not attempt to go near money lenders."

Just over one in eight arrears cases involve amounts beyond €7,000.

40% of those in arrears have already agreed plans with officials to pay back their debts.

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