Dublin building is a fire safety risk and must be vacated immediately, court hears

Dublin building is a fire safety risk and must be vacated immediately, court hears

A Dublin City centre premises which houses a textile business and is used for residential purposes is a fire safety risk and must be vacated immediately, the High Court has heard, writes Ann O'Loughlin.

At the High Court today lawyers for Ms Anne O'Dwyer of Duff & Phelps who was appointed receiver ove a property located at 24 Mountjoy Square, which incorporates the premises known as 24 Charles Lane in Dublin 1 said the building is potentially dangerous and is being used for a purpose which is not permitted.

Mr Justice Michael Twomey was told by Nevan Powell Bl for the receiver that Dublin City Council served a Fire Safety Notice on the building in August of last year which has not been complied with.

Counsel said the building not only poses a safety risk to those occupying it but also to "surrounding buildings" and "the general public."

The receiver's action is against the property's owner Mr Christopher Singh and TWI Textile Machinery and Fabric Company Ltd, which partially occupies and operates from the Mountjoy Square premises.

It is claimed Mr Singh of Lisnacree, Castleknock Road, Castleknock, Dublin 15 is a director and the sole shareholder of the company.

Mr Powell Bl said the premises, which his client has been unable to get access to since her appointed, has been used both for residential purposes and by the company to make textiles.

The Fire Safety Notice was put in place almost a year ago. However the premises is still being used for residential purposes.

The notice bans it from being used as a hostel, flats or other multi-occupancy residential use, counsel said.

Dublin City Council, following a recent inspection of the premises was now putting pressure on the receiver to deal with the situation and in a letter said the building "should be vacated with immediate effect," counsel said.

Mr Singh it is claimed borrowed money from Anglo Irish Bank, which changed its name to IBRC after it was acquired by the State. His loans were transferred to Kenmare Property Finance Ltd DAC in 2014.

The receiver was appointed by Kenmare over Mr Singh's assets, including the property at the centre of the proceedings, last March after he allegedly failed to repay a sum of €489,000 which the fund claims is due and owing.

The defendants, counsel said have been interfering with the receivership and his client, who wishes to sell the building, seeks an injunction restraining Mr Singh and the company from trespassing or occupying the premises.

Permission to serve short notice of the proceedings was granted, on an ex-parte basis, by Mr Justice Twomey. The case will come back before the court on Friday.


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