Dublin becomes first Irish city to commit to improving air quality

Dublin becomes first Irish city to commit to improving air quality
An aerial view of Dublin

Dublin could see more of its road space allocated to walking, cycling and public transport as part of its pledge to improve air quality in the city.

On Monday, Dublin became the first Irish city to sign a commitment to meet World Health Organisation (WHO) air quality guideline values by 2030.

In a joint pledge, the Deputy Lord Mayor of Dublin and the mayors/cathaoirligh of the other three Dublin local authorities signed up to the BreatheLife campaign.

By signing up to the campaign, Dublin will be joining 76 cities, regions and countries around the globe in demonstrating a commitment to bring air quality to safe levels by 2030 and collaborating on clean air solutions.

Those backing the pledge want to allocate more road space to walking, cycling and public transport, move away from burning solid and fossil fuels to heat homes and make choosing the right choices simple and economically viable.

Dr Maria Neira, from WHO, said that Dublin will be looking at how it can reduce its pollution.

Speaking at an event in the Mansion House, Dr Neira said the results will have a positive impact on the public’s health.

“In the beginning, there might be some difficulties and it might not be very popular in certain aspects, but when the city sees the benefits and see they can breathe air that doesn’t affect their health in a negative way, when they see they have good mobility and sustainable transport, they are appreciated.

“We are talking about our own health and the protection of our lungs.

“When you tackle the causes of air pollution, you start to see the benefits for your health. We know the pollution is very much associated with cardiovascular diseases and stroke so we need to do more.”

According to the WHO, 92% of people around the world breathe air quality which falls short of the recommended guidelines.

The Deputy Lord Mayor of Dublin, Tom Brabazon, called for people living in Dublin to be “climate brave”.

He said: “Hitting the target in the BreatheLife campaign will involve difficult and potentially unpopular decisions.

“So we’ll all need to be brave if we’re to make the right decisions for our city.”

Earlier: Dublin local authorities come together for 'Breathe Life' campaign to improve air quality

Dublin is to become the first Irish city to sign a commitment to bring air quality to safe levels by 2030.

Dublin becomes first Irish city to commit to improving air quality

All four local authorities in the county are joining the 'Breathe Life' campaign.

Deputy Lord Mayor of Dublin, Tom Brabazon, says hitting the targets will involve difficult and potentially unpopular decisions.

He's calling on Dubliners to be 'Climate Brave' in order to make the changes happen.

Mayor of Fingal, Cllr Eoghan O’ Brien added: “We are seeing more of the impacts of climate change on our environment and the actions that are needed to tackle this crisis require the support of the entire community.

"We have already acted in Fingal to improve air quality with programs like the School Streets initiative which has already reduced carbon emissions outside of a primary school in Malahide."

According to the World Health Organisation 92% of people around the world breathe air quality which falls short of the recommended guidelines.

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