Doughnut store makes a lot of dough — €42,000 a day

Doughnut store makes a lot of dough — €42,000 a day

Making a lot of dough is one thing, but ‘Kreming’ it is more than food for thought.

The record-breaking Krispy Kreme doughnut store at Blanchardstown in Dublin cooked up average weekly mouth-watering revenues of almost €300,000 last year.

That is according to the business’s first set of accounts which show that from September 29 to the end of December last year, Krispy Kreme Ireland Ltd recorded revenues of €3.86m — or an average weekly revenue at the store of €293,695.

The spend by customers works out at an average of €41,956 per day. That comes as little surprise, as the store’s opening was greeted by a consumer mania not seen here in recent years.

There was a queue of 300 people when the store opened its doors at 7am on its first day of operation on September 29 last year. Thousands of customers streamed through the doors during that first day, making it the biggest store opening for Krispy Kreme across the world.

Soon after, however, the store stopped its 24/7 drive thru operation because of multiple complaints from local residents about the endless queues of people who were eager for the Krispy Kreme doughnuts at all hours of the night.

During the height of the craze for the likes of the Original Glazed doughnut, local residents were posting footage on social media of customers beeping their car horns while they waited for service in the middle of the night. A spokesman for Krispy Kreme Ireland said yesterday that the store remains “the best-performing” Krispy Kreme store across the 1,300-strong network in 31 countries.

“We are really pleased with how Krispy Kreme and the Theatre Store in Blanchardstown has been received by the Irish market; the store outperformed our expectations and continues to be performing successfully,” said the spokesman.


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