Data protection breaches and unvetted staff among issues discovered by inspectors at HSE-run facilities

Data protection breaches and unvetted staff among issues discovered by inspectors at HSE-run facilities

Residents' records were discovered in a bin in a nursing home in Tipperary and 26 staff in another centre in Wexford were not garda vetted.

Inspectors from the Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) visited the HSE-run Dean Maxwell Community Unit in Roscrea, Co Tipperary, last April when 24 residents lived there.

They found that records containing personal, identifiable information about residents had been stored inappropriately in an open bin in an unsecured rear yard area.

Inspectors also discovered during the unannounced visit that a baby monitoring camera was used in a shared bedroom.

That is also being addressed by the HSE as a data protection breach.

The health authority was also told that a review of staff on night duty was needed because inspectors were concerned that the device was being used to monitor a resident instead of having additional staffing.

Inspectors also found there was still no fire extinguisher provided in or near the designated smoking area.

Also, cleaning chemicals were still stored in unlabelled containers.

An unannounced inspection of the HSE-run St John's Community Hospital in Enniscorthy, Co Wexford in May this year found that 26 staff members were not appropriately garda vetted.

While the person in charge had made an effort to have the necessary documentation it was not available at the time of the inspection.

The single-story centre that can accommodate up to 116 residents had 114 when the inspectors called.

Immediate action was taken with the unvetted staff members not allowed to attend work until their documentation was in order.

The provider was also asked to assure Hiqa that all staff were garda vetted.

Inspectors also found that several staff members continued to refer to residents as patients and that residents were not offered choice.

Inspectors saw that residents were handed a cup of tea without being asked their preference.

Lystoll Lodge Nursing Home in Listowel, Co Kerry, had 44 residents when inspectors found serious shortcomings in fire safety during an unannounced visit in April.

File photo
File photo

Action was taken to address several fire safety issues highlighted during a previous inspection but risks remained.

Immediate assurances were sought that adequate arrangements would be made for containing a fire and evacuating the premises in the event of a blaze.

Serious shortcomings were found at East Ferry House in Midleton, Co Cork, during an unannounced inspection in April.

The inspector said it had once again failed to meet the needs of residents.

Areas singled out for criticism included infection control, staffing issues, medicine management, accommodation and fire safety.

Six residents were living there but at night time there was still only one staff member on duty even though one resident required two people to support care and movement needs.

The person in charge said she was always on call to provide any help required.

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