Dad slammed fist on desk, breaking bone in hand, when told his baby boy was brain-damaged

Dad slammed fist on desk, breaking bone in hand, when told his baby boy was brain-damaged

The father of a boy who was left brain damaged after surgery at Crumlin Children’s Hospital says he was constantly told there was no hope for him.

Jude Miley’s injuries were caused after doctors failed to cut a stitch properly.

His father Greville Miley broke a bone in his hand when he slammed his fist on a desk after hearing his six-month old son was brain-damaged in January 2012.

Jude had undergone emergency surgery at Crumlin Children’s Hospital after going into cardiac arrest.

A procedure to assist his breathing was carried out two days beforehand and it emerged a piece of suture had not been cut correctly. It was piercing Jude's heart every time he took a breath.

Greville (pictured below with Jude's mum Louise Miley) said his doctors told him he may not survive being taken off life support and they gave him no hope of any sort of recovery.

But after raising funds for treatments abroad, he said his son, who is now four, made great strides and learned to communicate, feed himself and even run.

The hospital has admitted liability and a hearing is underway to assess how much his care will cost over an interim period, the duration of which is also to be decided.

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