Bowie backs Nokia's rival to iPod

David Bowie has signed up to help support a new music download service to be launched by mobile phone giant Nokia.

Music Recommenders will aim to rival Apple's iPod, allowing users access to download new music onto their computers in order to transfer them to their mobile phones.

The Let's Dance star has submitted features and podcasts to kickstart the service, although so far he is not believed to be appearing in advertising campaigns.

Nokia Multimedia Director Tommi Mustonen says: "We're thrilled to have David Bowie - a musical icon - sharing his passion for what is new in music.

"We are able to make a wealth of knowledge, passion and foresight available on a global scale."

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