Criminal Assets Bureau return over €3.8m to the Exchequer in 2016

Criminal Assets Bureau return over €3.8m to the Exchequer in 2016

The Criminal Assets Bureau returned over €3.8m to the Exchequer in 2016 including over €2.1m collected under Revenue legislation and €1.4m under proceeds of crime legislation, its latest report has shown.

The 21st annual report of the bureau since its establishment in 1996 also highlighted how the agency had brought 13 new proceeds of crime proceedings before the High court,

Presenting the report to the Dail today the Minister for Justice and Equality, Charlie Flanagan, acknowledged Chief Bureau Officer Pat Clavin and his staff for their dedicated work in targeting the proceeds of crime generated from a range of criminal activities.

“The Report highlights the activities undertaken by the Bureau during the year.”

“During 2016, the Bureau returned in excess of €3.8m to the Exchequer, including over €1.4m returned under Proceeds of Crime legislation, €2.1m collected under Revenue legislation and €0.297m recovered in Social Welfare overpayments.”

“In addition, the Bureau brought 13 new proceeds of crime proceedings before the High Court. Furthermore, taxes and interest demanded during the year was valued at €5.023m and social welfare savings amounted to €269,981.”

Minister Flanagan said the report also highlighted the work of the Bureau in contributing to the international response to targeting the proceeds of crime, as well as the ongoing capacity building efforts of the Bureau through the extension of the Assets Profiler Training Programme and the conclusion of the Asset Confiscation and Tracing Investigators Course in conjunction with the Garda College.

“I also want to acknowledge the significant profile the Bureau maintains at international level with law enforcement agencies and I note in the Chief Bureau Officer’s forwarding report that this cooperation has increased to the point where virtually every investigation currently underway has some international aspect to it.

"We have seen with the enactment of the Proceeds of Crime (Amendment) Act 2016 that the reach of the Bureau has extended in response to the increased organised crime threat. This Government is committed to fully supporting its work.”

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