Creighton: Next year's Budget 'will not be this difficult'

Creighton: Next year's Budget 'will not be this difficult'

Minister for European Affairs Lucinda Creighton has said that Budget 2013 is the "most painful point" of Ireland's financial adjustment.

Today TDs will begin debating the social welfare elements of the package, which have prompted an angry reaction both inside and outside Leinster House.

Another protest against plans for changes to the respite care grant is planned for outside the Dáil today.

But despite the reaction that greeted the Budget, Minister Creighton said there is always dissatisfaction when cutbacks are announced, and the measures have to be put in place.

"It's as balanced and as fair as I think it possibly can be, and we now have to implement it," she said.

"Ireland has a lot of strengths in its economy, we're moving in the right direction.

"This is the most difficult Budget that we're going to experience - next year will not be this difficult. The following year will be easier again.

"So this is really, I think, probably the most painful point of our four or five-year adjustment."

More on this topic

Noonan: Confidence returning to Irish economyNoonan: Confidence returning to Irish economy

Gilmore: No plans to remove rebels from Labour PartyGilmore: No plans to remove rebels from Labour Party

Labour Senator set to join Budget rebelsLabour Senator set to join Budget rebels

Burton regrets decision of expelled KeaveneyBurton regrets decision of expelled Keaveney


More in this Section

Coronavirus: HSE advises mass-goers not to shake hands to stop virus spreadCoronavirus: HSE advises mass-goers not to shake hands to stop virus spread

Work on €180m Limerick development to begin this yearWork on €180m Limerick development to begin this year

New hope for prospect of left minority GovernmentNew hope for prospect of left minority Government

Covid-19: Public transport users between Dublin-Belfast ‘need not be concerned’Covid-19: Public transport users between Dublin-Belfast ‘need not be concerned’


Lifestyle

Spring has sprung and a new Munster festival promises to celebrate its arrival with gusto, says Eve Kelliher.Spring has sprung: Munster festival promises to celebrate with gusto

The spotlight will fall on two Munster architects in a new showcase this year.Munster architects poised to build on their strengths

Prepare to fall for leather, whatever the weather, says Annmarie O'Connor.Trend of the week: It's always leather weather

The starting point for Michael West’s new play, in this joint production by Corn Exchange and the Abbey, is an alternative, though highly familiar, 1970s Ireland. You know, elections every few weeks, bad suits, wide ties, and a seedy nexus of politics and property development.Theatre Review: The Fall of the Second Republic at Abbey Theatre, Dublin

More From The Irish Examiner