Country could face worker shortage as unemployment levels continue to drop

Country could face worker shortage as unemployment levels continue to drop

It is feared that the country could face a worker shortage as employment levels reach those not seen since the Celtic Tiger.

The warning comes as the total income tax paid by workers is on course to hit a record high in 2018.

Figures from the Central Statistics Office show the unemployment rate now stands at just 5.1%, the lowest level recorded since 2012.

However, the housing crisis and spiralling rents are thought to be driving up wage demand.

Economist Jim Power has told the Irish Independent that this will make it difficult for employers to recruit and retain skilled workers.

He also claims the record employment will put more pressure on public services like transport, education and healthcare

The warning comes as the total income tax paid by Irish workers hit a record high this year of €1.7bn.

Digital Desk

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