Corporate watchdog to investigate FAS claims

The Tánaiste Mary Coughlan is taking legal advice on reviewing increased pension entitlements to former FAS chief executive Rody Molloy.

The increased entitlements have caused huge controversy since they emerged yesterday.

"Based on the new information provided by a board member, the Tánaiste is considering its implications and is reviewing the increased pension entitlements to Mr Molloy and is currently seeking legal advice on this matter," a spokesperson said today.

The Oireachtas Public Accounts Committee heard yesterday that Mr Molloy's length of public service was artificially increased by an extra 4.5 years as part of a €1m golden handshake deal.

The increase had the effect of pushing his pension lump sum up by €50,000 and his annual pension by around €11,000 per year.

Mr Molloy stepped down last November after revelations about the level of expenses received by FAS officials while he was in charge of the state training agency.

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