Cork punter turns €2 stake into €13,085 after bet on 'virtual race'

Cork punter turns €2 stake into €13,085 after bet on 'virtual race'

One lucky Cork punter has turned a €2 bet on a virtual race into a massive €13,085.42.

The BoyleSports customer, who wishes to remain anonymous, placed a €2 Tricast bet on the numbers 2-4-1 in the 7:13 at the virtual 'Kingston Meadows' track on Wednesday evening.

The bet came through, with the Tricast dividend paying €6,542.71 and the customer winning €13,085.42 for their €2 bet.

He/she also had €5 on another number in the race, spending €7 in total.

Cork punter turns €2 stake into €13,085 after bet on 'virtual race'

Liam Glynn, BoyleSports’ spokesperson said: “We would like to congratulate the lucky customer on their hefty win from such a small stake.

“Virtual betting continues to prove popular with our customers and it is certainly true to say that there is nothing virtual about a winner following the Cork customer’s latest win.”

A Straight Tricast bet consists of one bet that requires you to predict which selections will finish first, second and third in the correct order.


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