Cork flood damage to cost €35m

Cork City Council will have to spend almost €35m on flood repairs and future preventative measures following last month’s devastating floods.

The figure excludes the cost of damage to individual homes and businesses which is expected to run into tens of millions of euro.

Approximately €10m has already been spent by the city council on essential flood measures such as repairing the damaged water pumps on the Lee Road, purchasing water bottles, replacing mobile homes and overtime payments for council workers.

It will cost €18m to upgrade the Lee Road waterworks and construct the water pump’s plant room at a higher level to guard against flooding.

Some €2m will be needed to repair the quay walls on Grenville Place and Sunday’s Well.

Flood damage costs €35m.

An estimated €3m will be spent on building a new water main from the Wilton Road roundabout to the Lee Road to link the county and city water systems to ensure future security of supply.

The figures come following a City Council report which shows that the ESB underestimated the volume of water it needed to release from the Inniscarra Dam.

In his report to City Councillors last night, the City Manager Joe Gavin made a number of recommendations to safeguard the city’s water supply for the future.

He said the most urgent priority now is to seek €18m from the Department of the Environment to carry out upgrades at the Lee Road Water Treatment Plant.

Article courtesy of The Evening Echo newspaper.

More on this topic

Limerick grandmother at 'wits end' as house floods five times in 72 hoursLimerick grandmother at 'wits end' as house floods five times in 72 hours

Limerick homes flooded twice in a dayLimerick homes flooded twice in a day

Homes in Limerick and Clare flooded after Shannon bursts banksHomes in Limerick and Clare flooded after Shannon bursts banks

The Irish Examiner View: Do ask an expertThe Irish Examiner View: Do ask an expert


More in this Section

Boy, 6, dies in tragic drowning accident in Co MayoBoy, 6, dies in tragic drowning accident in Co Mayo

Gardaí appeal for help finding missing Meath teenGardaí appeal for help finding missing Meath teen

Coronavirus: Irish tourists in Peru on way homeCoronavirus: Irish tourists in Peru on way home

Coronavirus: Homeless support workers deemed essential, Eoghan Murphy clarifiesCoronavirus: Homeless support workers deemed essential, Eoghan Murphy clarifies


Lifestyle

Louisa Earls is a manager at Books Upstairs, D’Olier St, Dublin, which is owned by her father, Maurice Earls.Virus response writes a new chapter for Books Upstairs

'That ladder you’ve got out is it safe; do you know what you’re doing?'Ireland's DIYers causing problems for doctors during covid19 crisis

I'm writing this column on March 25. Dates are suddenly vital. Measures to lower the death toll from Covid-19 improve daily. For some of us, their early implementation makes the difference between life and death.Damien Enright: Coping with confinement by coronavirus in the Canaries

There are almost three million motor vehicles in Ireland, more than one for every two people.Richard Collins: Glimmer of hope for the dwindling hedgehog

More From The Irish Examiner