Console controversy 'will impact other charities'

Console controversy 'will impact other charities'

The founder of the Jack and Jill Foundation has said that the controversy over funding at Console will do significant damage to the charity sector.

Paul Kelly resigned as the CEO of the suicide-prevention charity over alleged financial irregularities at the organisation.

Yesterday, lawyers for Console were given permission to serve injunctions on Mr Kelly and his wife Patricia by email - which prevents them from accessing charity bank accounts.

It follows previous public controversies over high levels of salaries paid to top executives at the Central Remedial Clinic and the Rehab Group in 2013 and 2014.

Founder and CEO of the Jack and Jill Foundation Jonathan Irwin, said that these types of controversies damage the reputation of the not-for-profit sector.

"It's awful for the people who have been working at Console, it's awful for the people that they've kept back from the edge of the precipice, but it's [also] awful for every single charity," he said.

"CRC and Rehab knocked, I think, all of us between 35-50%. Console is going to be as damaging, if not more."

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