Conradh na Gaeilge celebrates 125th year today

Conradh na Gaeilge celebrates 125th year today

Irish cultural organisation Conradh na Gaeilge is today celebrating its 125th year.

It was founded in Dublin back in 1893, with Douglas Hyde as its first president.

The group aims to promote Irish culture and is credited with the revival of the Irish language.

President Michael D. Higgins has congratulated the Conradh na Gaeilge on the milestone and thanked them for their efforts to promote the language and encourage its uptake.

He said: “Irish is alive in Gaeltacht areas, it is alive in naíonraí and Gaelscoileanna, it is alive in summer camps, it is alive in families all over the country, it is alive in the media and it is alive in conversation groups, in book clubs, in “pop-up” Gaeltachtaí and in music sessions all over the country and all over the world.

We are now ready to take the next step towards the living vision of the renaissance, that is to encourage the use of Irish and to disseminate it proudly and all over the country and the world.

Niall Comer, President of Conradh na Gaeilge, said: “On 31 July 1893, 125 years ago today, Douglas Hyde, Eoin McNeill and seven others gathered together in Dublin to found an organisation which would go on to profoundly influence the history of this country from a linguistic, cultural, and social perspective.

"The Irish language was in grave decline at that time, but through the efforts of members of Conradh na Gaeilge at community and at national level and those of other Irish language and Gaeltacht groups which have since come into existence, the Irish language is still spoken and thriving today.

There are many challenges to overcome, however, particularly in the Gaeltacht, but there is no question anymore that the Irish language will not survive.

- Digital Desk

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