Concern at lack of time for Dáil to pass legislation ahead of potential no deal Brexit

Concern at lack of time for Dáil to pass legislation ahead of potential no deal Brexit
Labour leader Brendan Howlin

The Labour leader has warned the Dáil will have very little time in the new year to pass emergency Brexit legislation in the event of no deal.

Reports have suggested as many as 45 pieces of law will need to be passed to deal with the worst case scenario.

All sides have stepped up their plans for a no deal Brexit in the last few weeks.

But Labour leader Brendan Howlin is worried it’s not happening fast enough:

"When the Dáil comes back we will have 29 sitting days between the time we come back and Brexit day (March 29).

"That's a very short timeline to give proper scrutiny to that volume of legislation and statutory instruments."

A Government department has spent more than £100 million on ferries to ease potential problems in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Documents outlining the £107.7 million agreements say increased border checks in UK ports after Brexit could “cause delivery of critical goods to be delayed” in the event of no deal.

The move was described as “complete madness” by the Liberal Democrats, who said public money is being spent recklessly in a last-minute bid to prepare for a no-deal outcome.

The UK Department for Transport says they'll provide additional crossings to ensure extra capacity.

The agreements would see Brittany Ferries, DFDS and Seaborne Freight laying on ships from ports including Dover, Portsmouth, Poole and Plymouth.

- Additional reporting Press Association

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