Commuters face travel chaos as talks fail in Irish Rail dispute

Commuters face travel chaos as talks fail in Irish Rail dispute

Commuters nationwide will face travel chaos after talks to resolve the Irish Rail dispute failed.

Supporters heading to Republic of Ireland's World Cup play-off game against Denmark in Dublin next week will also suffer.

More train stoppages have been scheduled over the next few weeks, including match day on November 14, as workers protest to demand a 3.75% pay increase.

A stoppage is expected tomorrow, with no trains operating across Intercity, Dart and commuter routes.

Iarnród Éireann management said that as more than 150,000 journeys are made on the network daily, it is not possible to provide alternative transport on dates of industrial action.

It also said it regrets the decision by the company's trade unions to schedule the strikes during November and December.

No rail services will operate tomorrow, November 7, November 14, November 23 and December 8.

December 8 is traditionally a busy pre-Christmas shopping day.

Iarnród Éireann said passengers will be entitled to refunds for monthly, annual and other tickets.

The announcement of strikes was made after a collapse of talks at the Workplace Relations Commission over pay.

Unions had sought annual pay increases of about 3.75% similar to the rises secured by workers at Dublin Bus and Luas after strikes last year.

In a statement, Iarnród Éireann said the effect of the strikes would be disruption to customers, loss of pay for its employees, a weakening of the company's finances - which has accumulated loses of €160m - and a reduction of its ability to address the pay claim.

More on this topic

'Unfinished business': Over 1,000 SIPTU and Fórsa members strike in pay restoration dispute'Unfinished business': Over 1,000 SIPTU and Fórsa members strike in pay restoration dispute

1,000 healthcare workers to strike over pay restoration1,000 healthcare workers to strike over pay restoration

'Government giving two fingers': Community employment supervisors strike over pension rights'Government giving two fingers': Community employment supervisors strike over pension rights

Community workers strike over pay and pensions in DublinCommunity workers strike over pay and pensions in Dublin


More in this Section

Around 98% of Covid-19 tests showing negative, says HSEAround 98% of Covid-19 tests showing negative, says HSE

Four deaths and 57 new cases associated with Covid-19 confirmedFour deaths and 57 new cases associated with Covid-19 confirmed

North reports one new Covid-19 death and 25 extra casesNorth reports one new Covid-19 death and 25 extra cases

Testing times: The science of fighting Covid-19Testing times: The science of fighting Covid-19


Lifestyle

Last week, I wrote about 'small is beautiful' as a key to an improved environment for all living things after this Covid crisis is finally over. As I wrote, I saw, in the mind's eye, the village where I live in west Cork and from which my wife and I are temporarily exiled.Damien Enright: Community spirit can ensure we pull through - together

Fifty years ago, a fox was spotted in Dublin’s St. Stephen’s Green. The unfortunate animal was chased by local ‘gurriers’. It took refuge in a tree but was promptly stoned to death.Richard Collins: Wildlife taking back the streets of our cities

The north pier on Cape Clear has been eerily quiet these last few months as no visitors disembark. The ferry is not unloading boatloads of tourists from Baltimore, 45 minutes away, or from Schull, as it would normally.The Islands of Ireland: Cape Clear tells its side of the story

If the Donegal postman and amateur weather forecaster has it right, we could be in for water shortages in the coming months. Michael Gallagher, who predicted the scorching summer of 2018 and the 2010 freeze-up, says we’ll have a ‘lovely’ summer.Donal Hickey: Demand for water to soar

More From The Irish Examiner