Comedian Byrne guilty of driving 91kph in 60kph zone

Comedian Byrne guilty of driving 91kph in 60kph zone

Comedian Jason Byrne has been hit with a fine for breaking the speed limit on a road in Dublin.

Byrne (aged 41) pleaded guilty at Dublin District Court today to speeding on the R132, Pinnock Hill, Swords at 8.59pm on May 10 last.

He was told that he has two months to pay €80 to avoid being jailed for two days.

Garda James Curtis told Judge Anthony Halpin today that he had been operating speed detection equipment when the '08-reg car Byrne was driving passed him.

The comedian and radio presenter had been “driving at a speed of 91kph in a 60kph zone”, the judge was told.

An €80 fixed penalty notice had also been sent to Byrne, who has an address in Oldtown, Co Dublin, and a court summons followed at a later stage.

It was the second date the case was in court after an adjournment was granted in December when Byrne did not attend.

However, today he turned up to face the charge.

Judge Halpin was also told that Byrne had one prior conviction for speeding dating back to 2008.

The popular entertainer, dressed in black, stood up and confirmed that he was pleading guilty to the offence.

The judge noted the speed detected by the garda and said it was "quite significant".

He asked the comedian, “Do you want to explain?” at which Byrne replied , “it was a dead straight road, I was just not keeping an eye on it”.

Judge Halpin convicted and imposed the fine on Byrne, who is currently on tour.

The judge also directed that the fine must be paid within two months or else Byrne will be jailed for two days in default.

The stand-up, who wrote and starred in the sitcom 'Father Figure' last year, said “Thank you” to Judge Halpin as the case was finalised.


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