Case deemed 'too serious' for Children's Court

The case of a 17-year-old boy who allegedly beat a man’s head off a pavement repeatedly is too serious to be heard in the Children’s Court, a judge has ruled.

The boy was charged at the Children’s Court today with assault causing harm to a man, on Shangan Road, Ballymun, in north Dublin, on October 6 last. He made no reply when the charge was put to him.

Garda Ciaran Kennedy of Ballymun station told Judge Patrick McMahon it was alleged the victim was chased by the defendant before the attack.

“He was punched and kicked while on the ground. It is alleged the accused inflicted several blows on his head with his feet, banging his head off the ground.”

Defence solicitor John Quinn pleaded with the judge not to refuse jurisdiction and send the case to the Circuit Court, which on conviction can impose lengthier sentences.

He submitted that a medical report on the alleged victim did not say he suffered long term injury.

However, Judge McMahon refused and held the case was too serious for the Children’s Court.

The north Dublin teenager, who was accompanied to the proceedings by his mother, is in custody on other matters.

Judge McMahon granted the boy legal aid and remanded him to appear again later this month when he is to be served with the book of evidence and sent forward for trial to the Dublin Circuit Court.

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