Carrigaline tops Household Income List in Munster with average earnings of €59,353

Carrigaline tops Household Income List in Munster with average earnings of €59,353

A Geographical Profile of Income in Ireland shows households in South County Dublin fare much better than households in counties such as Longford and Donegal, where dependency on social welfare payments is far higher and where two in five have a medical card.

The monetary advantage of living in Leinster is underscored by the finding that of the 10 highest income towns in Ireland, just one, Carrigaline in County Cork, is outside Leinster, according to new figures for 2016 published by the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

The research identifies Malahide, County Dublin, as the town where households have the highest median income of almost €79,000 - more than two and a half times that of households in Longford town at €29,2224.

Of the 41 towns included, with populations of 10,000 plus, Carrigaline has the highest median for Munster at €59,353, followed by Midleton at €44,382, Cobh at €43,630 and Mallow at €38,808.

At electoral division level, households in Dún-Laoghaire-Rathdown fare best, at €66,203, more than double the income of households in Donegal at €32,259.

Carrigaline tops Household Income List in Munster with average earnings of €59,353

Cork County came in ahead of Cork City - median household income in the county was €49,489 compared to €38,008. The median income for households across the state was €45,256.

Nearly two thirds (62.6%) of Irish households had a gross income of less than €60,000 in 2016, while more than one in 10 (14.1%) had an income above €100,000. For house renters, the burden was highest in South Dublin, with average rent at 33.3% of household disposable income, while the lowest was 21.1% in Longford.

Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown had the lowest proportion of households where the majority of gross income came from working age social welfare at 5.8%, compared to one in five households in Longford and Donegal.

Donegal and Longford also had the highest proportion of people on medical cards (more than two in five) while Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown had the lowest at 16.3%.

In terms of education, those who held an honours degree qualification as their highest level of education and were working in Dublin City had a median earned income of €44,664 in 2016, the highest in the country, followed by South Dublin (€44,479) and Cork County (€43,861).

The median earned income for those with a PhD was €60,912, nearly five times higher than the €14,684 for a person with no education. Dublin City had the highest earned income per person working for payment or profit at €39,999 in 2016, followed by Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown (€37,117) and Cork City (€34,317).

Males earned higher incomes across medicine, financial management, the legal profession and ICT. The comparison is not adjusted for hours worked. The largest gender difference was for ‘Financial managers and directors’, where the median earned income for females of €60,126 was about two-thirds the male median of €94,500. Financial managers and directors earned a median income of €96,846 in Cork City in 2016, the highest in the country.

The highest median earned income was for the ICT, Scientific & Recreation sectors at €37,037. The research also found that commuters who travel for longer earn more - almost €9,500 more if they travel for more than 30 minutes.

Commuters on motorcycles or scooters had the highest median value for earned income of €47,689, followed by commuters on bikes (€44,812), with the lowest median values (€29,200) for commuters who were car passengers.

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