CAO: 56% of higher degrees increase in points

CAO: 56% of higher degrees increase in points

It is D-day for thousands of students around the country as they receive third level course offers from the CAO.

As expected, points for many courses are up, although many others have fallen.

It's reported 56% of higher degree university courses have registered an increase in CAO points.

However, one of the country's main teaching unions is expressing concern that the bonus points for honours maths in the Leaving Cert has pushed up points levels for third level courses.

TUI President Gerard Craughwell thinks the bonus needs to be reconsidered.

"It was a very crude instrument to entice students to take up maths. We feel that the points for all subjects will increase and that's a concern to us."

Amongst the largest leaps is science at UCD, which broke through the 500 point barrier for the first time - making it 200 points higher than it was six years ago.

Meanwhile, Trinity College Dublin has recorded the highest number of top-level courses which have seen points increase, at 81%


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