'Cancer Atlas' reveals geographical differences

Levels of cancer are shown to be higher in certain areas of the country

Information gathered by the National Cancer Registry for its first 'Atlas of Cancer' due to be published today shows the emergence of geographical differences.

The study examined common cancers over a10-year period and found that areas that are more densely populated consistently have a higher risk of the disease than areas with less people

For example it found a higher incidence for all malignant forms of the disease around Dublin and Cork

Regions with more agricultural workers have a lower risk of the disease

The report also reveals a higher than average incidence of bowel cancer in Cork city while the incidence of lung cancer is highest in Leinster

The variations do not mean a particular location itself caused the cancer but instead are likely to reflect socio-economic differences in the population, exposure to risk factors and uptake of cancer screening.

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