British government to spend €330m supporting peace projects in Northern Ireland

British government to spend €330m supporting peace projects in Northern Ireland

The UK Government has confirmed it will spend around €330m (£300m) supporting EU-backed peace projects in Northern Ireland as part of its commitments under the Brexit deal.

The Northern Ireland Office said the UK Government had committed to contributing millions of pounds “as part of its unwavering commitment to uphold the hard-won peace in Northern Ireland after Brexit”.

The funding will be made available until 2027.

This funding will help deliver vital projects on both sides of the Irish border, supporting co-operation and reconciliation and ensuring that generations to come grow up in a more peaceful and stable society

Northern Ireland Secretary of State Karen Bradley said: “This funding will help deliver vital projects on both sides of the Irish border, supporting co-operation and reconciliation and ensuring that generations to come grow up in a more peaceful and stable society.”

The Peace Plus scheme will succeed the current Peace programme, which was designed to help promote economic and social progress in Northern Ireland and the border region of Ireland.

It has been running since 1995 with funding from the UK, Ireland and EU, and will end in 2020.

The UK Government will work with the EU Commission and Irish government to shape the programme over the next round of the EU’s Multi-Annual Financial Framework.

Last May, the EU set out its plan to make €120m (£109m) in funding to continue peace projects in Northern Ireland post-Brexit.

The funding from the EU and UK will enable work to continue on the construction of almost €2bn (£1.8bn) worth of projects in both Northern Ireland and Ireland.

Among the projects to have received funding to date has been the €16m (£14.5m) Peace Bridge in Derry, which was opened in 2011 and links communities across the River Foyle.

Youth Action NI in Belfast is one of the organisations that has benefited under the existing scheme.

The group used the money to set up the Youth Network for Peace, a regional project involving 10,000 young people in a range of social action projects on a cross-community and cross-border basis.

- Press Association

More on this topic

Brexit Secretary: No-deal would be disruptive, but could be mitigatedBrexit Secretary: No-deal would be disruptive, but could be mitigated

Next Tory leader will have to compromise as Boris accused of 'radicalising' on BrexitNext Tory leader will have to compromise as Boris accused of 'radicalising' on Brexit

Ursula von der Leyen as next European Commission president 'very good news for Ireland'Ursula von der Leyen as next European Commission president 'very good news for Ireland'

Sterling slides to 90p against euro on prospects of Brexit Halloween frightSterling slides to 90p against euro on prospects of Brexit Halloween fright

More in this Section

Micheál Martin calls for new Department of Higher Education and ResearchMicheál Martin calls for new Department of Higher Education and Research

Government set to oppose EU daylight saving time plansGovernment set to oppose EU daylight saving time plans

Court hears man threatened to kill garda and her husband and made 'offensive' phonecalls to four othersCourt hears man threatened to kill garda and her husband and made 'offensive' phonecalls to four others

More than 50% of Irish people admit to wasting waterMore than 50% of Irish people admit to wasting water


Lifestyle

Close to Lisbon but far less crowded, this pleasant town is the ideal base for rest and relaxation, says Liz Ryan.Cascais: The dreamy Portuguese seaside town you really need to know

Here are some ideas if you’re finding shows limited in terms of representation.5 shows that will offer your child a more diverse view of the world

Mix up your usual Friday night fish supper with this Japanese inspired number.How to make salmon teriyaki

Limestone, a river and Theodore Roosevelt. Luke Rix-Standing peels through the layers of one of nature’s mightiest sites.As the Grand Canyon turns 100 – a brief history of the world’s most famous rock formation

More From The Irish Examiner