Boy in court in connection with petrol bomb attack on elderly woman

A 14-year-old boy built a petrol bomb which was used in an attack on the home of a 78-year-old woman who suffers from Parkinson's Disease, it was alleged today.

The victim in the case is also a peace commissioner and had three petrol bombs thrown at her home the Dublin Children's Court was told.

The boy, now aged 15, has been charged with having a petrol bomb under his control with intent to use it or permit another to use it to damage the injured party's property in a way which would endanger her life.

The alleged incident happened in north Dublin, on the evening of March 6 last, Judge Bryan Smyth was told.

In an outline of the prosecution's evidence, Judge Smyth heard that “gardaí received reports of youths throwing petrol bombs at the home of an elderly peace commissioner who suffers from Parkinson's Disease.”

A number of youths were arrested including the defendant, who was accompanied to his case by his mother.

“During interviews he made certain admissions that he made the petrol bomb but denied throwing them at the house,” a garda said.

“They knew a peace commissioner lived there, three petrol bombs were made and thrown at the house and one was intended for a garda patrol car that was attending the scene on the date in question,” the court also heard.

Defence solicitor Sarah Molloy pleaded for the case to be kept in the Children's Court and not sent forward to the Circuit Court, which has wider sentencing powers.

She said that it was accepted that the allegations against the boy were very serious but asked the court to note that no injuries were caused. She also asked the judge to take into consideration that the teenager had made some admissions and was aged 14 at the time.

The defence submissions were made under Section 75 of the Children Act. This sets out grounds where the Children's Court can deal with a case involving serious allegations, by taking into consideration the age and level of maturity of a juvenile defendant - a person under the age of 18.

The court also heard that the boy has returned to full time education.

Judge Smyth decided to keep the case in the jurisdiction of the Children's Court and remanded the boy on bail to appear again next month to allow him time to consider his plea.

Ms Molloy said she had received disclosure of prosecution statements and needed time to go through them with her client.

The teenager will also face separate charges on his next court date relating to alleged handling of a stolen motorcycle.


More in this Section

Limerick University Hospital's second MRI scanner will have 'very significant impact' on waiting timesLimerick University Hospital's second MRI scanner will have 'very significant impact' on waiting times

Six women and five men to face charges relating to more than 200 counts of sexual abuse and child neglectSix women and five men to face charges relating to more than 200 counts of sexual abuse and child neglect

Government accused of seeking to implement €45 million tax cuts to pharmacies fundingGovernment accused of seeking to implement €45 million tax cuts to pharmacies funding

Micheál Martin signals that pact could be agreed for post-Easter general election next yearMicheál Martin signals that pact could be agreed for post-Easter general election next year


Lifestyle

This truck serves as an excellent metaphor for what needs to happen in our education system. A colossal truck needs to barge in front of it.Secret Diary of an Irish Teacher: Time to ditch private schools

Sorting out Cork people for ages...Ask Audrey: Is it still ok to just lob the gob after 10 pints?

Nip those winter ailments in the bud with the help of garden bounty. Fiann Ó Nualláin shows you how.Have a berry merry Christmas with the help of garden bounty

Dig a planting hole around three times the size of its pot and around the same depth, loosening the soil around the hole.Your quick guide to planting trees

More From The Irish Examiner