Body of farmer taken in by fraudster granny to be buried next week

Body of farmer taken in by fraudster granny to be buried next week
Julia McKitterick and Thomas Ruttle

By David Raleigh

Funeral arrangements have been finalised for a farmer caught in the web of a convicted fraudster after both he and the woman were found dead in his house on May 18.

Father of two Thomas Ruttle will be buried next Wednesday following a 2pm service at St Mary's Church of Ireland, Askeaton.

His body is to laid to rest in the adjoining cemetery.

The body of his partner Julia McKitterick, who was last using two aliases -- Julia Holmes and Croen Ruttle -- is to be buried in a pauper's grave as her next-of-kin have declined to claim her body.

The bodies of Mr Ruttle, 56, and Ms McKitterick, 63, were discovered by a three-man gang in a decomposing state when the burglars broke into Mr Ruttle's farmhouse at Boolaglass, Askeaton.

Suicide letters were found in the house. However, post mortems on both bodies could not determine how the pair died.

Gardaí -- who suspect Mr Ruttle and Ms McKitterick died from a poisoning suicide pact -- are awaiting toxicology tests taken from tissue samples from the bodies to help determine a cause of death.

It is believed Mr Ruttle had discovered Ms McKitterick had swindled local workers out of thousands of euro after she hired them to renovate the Ruttle farmhouse. It is understood she had planned to sell off the home and flee the country.

The Co Down grandmother was previously convicted of fraud in America and served part a 27-month jail sentence in Texas.

She was also wanted by police in the North and had left a trail of other alleged fraud offences in Australia.

Her son has told some media that he will not claim her body for burial.

If her body is not claimed for burial, West Limerick Coroner, Brendan Nix, will ask Limerick City and County Council to arrange a pauper’s funeral.


More in this Section

Fine Gael Senator's office vandalised in same week 250 of his posters are stolenFine Gael Senator's office vandalised in same week 250 of his posters are stolen

Cork Gardaí play down fears Cameron Blair stabbing suspect has fled countryCork Gardaí play down fears Cameron Blair stabbing suspect has fled country

Two men questioned in connection with Dublin shooting released without chargeTwo men questioned in connection with Dublin shooting released without charge

Paschal Donohoe: 'No panic' in Fine Gael over bad opinion pollPaschal Donohoe: 'No panic' in Fine Gael over bad opinion poll


Lifestyle

I see that a website describes the call of Canarian cory’s shearwaters as ‘waca waca’. It’s a mad, hysterical call, uttered when the parent birds arrive to feed their nestlings.Cory’s shearwaters show long-distance qualities

Is it too much to hope that an important public health matter, such as Lyme disease, will be an issue in the general election? There’s been a worrying reluctance by the authorities to face up to the extent of the disease here.Facing up to Lyme disease

A paper published in Current Biology examines the extinction of a colourful little bird which, until recently, thrived in the eastern US. With the appalling environmental catastrophe enveloping Australia, home to 56 of the world’s 370 parrot species, this account of the Carolina parakeet’s demise is timely.Trying to save the parrot is not all talk

The recent rescue of a trawler 20km north of Fanad Head in Co Donegal gave us a glimpse of the enormous seas that occasionally strike that part of the coast.Islands of Ireland: Inishbeg Island begs the question

More From The Irish Examiner