Barmen deny alcohol death charge in Tipperary

Barmen deny alcohol death charge in Tipperary

Two barmen have denied the manslaughter of a British man who died from acute alcohol intoxication almost three years ago.

A jury has been sworn in for the landmark prosecution against Gary Wright and Aidan Dalton in Nenagh, Tipperary.

The case – the first of its kind under liquor liability laws in Ireland – will be opened by the prosecution this afternoon.

Mr Wright, 34, a bar manager at the historic Hayes Hotel in Thurles, and Mr Dalton, a 29-year-old barman, pleaded not guilty to the unlawful killing of hotel guest Graham Parish.

Mr Parish, from Calder Terrace in Lomeshaye village near Nelson, east Lancashire in England, was a resident at the hotel when he died by acute alcohol intoxication.

Paddy McCarthy, senior counsel for the State at Nenagh Circuit Court, told the court the 26-year-old’s body was discovered in the conference room shortly after 6am on the morning of July 1, 2008.

The dead man’s parents, David and Julie, were in court for the case – which is expected to run until Friday or early next week.

The barmen, who are both from Kilfithmone, Borrisoleigh in Co Tipperary, each pleaded not guilty to a charge of unlawful killing before a jury was sworn in.

The co-accused were employed at the Hayes Hotel on Liberty Square in Thurles.

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