Baby-sitter rape trial nears end

The concluding stages have been reached in the trial of a Wexford man charged with raping a 14-year-old baby-sitter in 2006.

The 30-year-old man has pleaded not guilty to raping and sexually assaulting the teenager in his sister's home in a Wexford town on November 25, 2006.

Closing speeches are being made by prosecution counsel, Mr Thomas Creed SC (with Mr Sean Gillane BL), and defence counsel, Mr John O'Kelly SC (with Mr Colman Cody BL) on day-four of the hearing.

The jury of four women and eight men will retire to begin deliberation after it has been charged by Mr Justice Paul Carney.

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