Average lunch break 'down to 22 minutes'

Average lunch break 'down to 22 minutes'

Work is eating into the average lunch break which now stands at only 22 minutes, a survey has found.

A poll of 2,672 employees across Ireland also found a jacket potato is the most popular food followed by fruit, pre-packed salad, pre-packed sandwiches and chips.

The average lunchtime has been sliced from 45 minutes to 20 minutes since recruitment firm Peninsula carried out its previous survey in 2005.

The poll also found that almost three in four employees are now choosing to spend their breaks at their desks.

The traditional pub lunch was second food choice in 2005, but now no longer features in the top five.

Peninsula Ireland, which also advises workers on employment law, said a shorter lunch time can lead to unproductive staff.

“Irish employees are considering their lunch breaks as less important and an increasing number are actually taking a shorter lunch as they find themselves too far behind to take a full lunch hour,” said Peninsula Ireland chief Alan Price.

“They choose to catch up on work during their lunch hour, thereby not giving themselves enough time to properly rest. This is counter productive and only leads to poorer quality of work and an increase in tiredness towards the end of the day.”

Mr Price said Irish employers are legally obliged to give employees an hour break for an eight-hour shift.

“Employees are well within their rights to demand they are given appropriate breaks and I would advise them to ensure that they take their full hours entitlement. A full break allows workers to rest and refresh themselves so that they are ready for the afternoon.”

“People should ensure they are taking their full breaks and employers should ensure they are encouraging and not discouraging staff from taking these breaks.

“There are laws in place for a reason and it is actually less efficient for employees to only take a short break as they often find that productivity and work rate suffers towards the end of the day.”


More in this Section

Fine Gael Senator's office vandalised in same week 250 of his posters are stolenFine Gael Senator's office vandalised in same week 250 of his posters are stolen

Cork Gardaí play down fears Cameron Blair stabbing suspect has fled countryCork Gardaí play down fears Cameron Blair stabbing suspect has fled country

Two men questioned in connection with Dublin shooting released without chargeTwo men questioned in connection with Dublin shooting released without charge

Paschal Donohoe: 'No panic' in Fine Gael over bad opinion pollPaschal Donohoe: 'No panic' in Fine Gael over bad opinion poll


Lifestyle

Frank Keogh did not want to get a hearing aid. He was afraid that it would make him look old. But now, just several weeks after having one fitted, he says that he can’t do without it.Hearing tests: A word in your ear

I see that a website describes the call of Canarian cory’s shearwaters as ‘waca waca’. It’s a mad, hysterical call, uttered when the parent birds arrive to feed their nestlings.Cory’s shearwaters show long-distance qualities

Is it too much to hope that an important public health matter, such as Lyme disease, will be an issue in the general election? There’s been a worrying reluctance by the authorities to face up to the extent of the disease here.Facing up to Lyme disease

A paper published in Current Biology examines the extinction of a colourful little bird which, until recently, thrived in the eastern US. With the appalling environmental catastrophe enveloping Australia, home to 56 of the world’s 370 parrot species, this account of the Carolina parakeet’s demise is timely.Trying to save the parrot is not all talk

More From The Irish Examiner