Autism charity in danger of missing out on €300k

Autism charity in danger of missing out on €300k

Hundreds of thousands of euro worth of funding has been withheld from the country's largest autism charity.

Autism Action Ireland revealed earlier this week that it had not written a budget for this year.

Its CEO Brian Murnane also admitted that its helpline was chronically understaffed, while its outreach service was dealing with only two families.

Now Autism Action is in danger of missing out on €300,000 that was raised at this year's National Pyjama Day.

Early Childhood Ireland, which supports the fundraiser, says it will not deliver the money until it is sure it will be spent where it is needed.

Brian Murnane, CEO of Irish Autism.
Brian Murnane, CEO of Irish Autism.

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