Alleged attack by bouncer made epilepsy 'significantly worse', court hears

Alleged attack by bouncer made epilepsy 'significantly worse', court hears

A 28-year-old man has claimed before the High Court that his epilepsy has "significantly worsened" as a result of been beaten "black and blue" by bouncers at a nightclub he had earlier been refused entry.

In his action, Glen Turner claims that his epilepsy became so severe that he requires a degree of full-time care due to the assault he sustained by two doormen at the nightclub located at the Ardboyne Hotel, Navan Co Meath on September 21, 2001.

Mr Turner, with an address at Priory View, Johnstown, Navan has sued the Ardboyne's Hotels owners and operators Quinn Hotels Ltd, with a registered address at Hotel Kilmore, Dublin Road, Cavan.

In his claim for damages arising out of personal injuries he claims he suffered Mr Turner alleges that the defendants failed to have any regard for his safety and that the failed to control or supervise the bouncers who he claims assaulted and battered him.

The defendant has denied all of Mr Turner's claims and rejects that he is entitled to damages.

Opening the case today Hugh Mohan SC, appearing with Vincent Foley SC, for Mr Turner said that the attack had a "dramatic effect" on Glen's epilepsy.

Counsel said the assault occurred after Mr Turner and up to 25 others were denied entry to the hotel's nightclub. Counsel said somebody in the group threw an object at the bouncers.

Counsel said that up to five bouncers, who initially closed the door of the premises, then came outside where the group was located.

The group then dispersed and his client, who did not throw the object, was chased by two bouncers who when they caught up with him kicked and beat him.

Mr Turner, who was found at home the following morning by a relative, sustained injuries including multiple cuts and bruises to his head. Counsel said that Mr Turner did not loose consciousness and was taken to hospital later that day.

He said that before the attack Mr Turner, who has had epilepsy since a young age, had been managing to keep medical condition under control.

He had worked at a car sales showroom and at Supermacs in Navan. At Supermacs he had been employee of the month on two occasions and rose to a semi-managerial position.

However following the attack his epilepsy deteriorated. The frequency and length of his seizures increased and he required to be hospitalised on a number of occasions.

Mr Turner he added now has serious cognitive difficulties "to the degree that he must live at a HSE care centre" because he is incapable of independent living.

His problems include short term and long term memory loss, and his a poor regard for his own safety. Counsel said that Mr Turner's family would tell the court that Glen has "undergone a total personality change".

In 2005 he had nerve stimulator fitted to reduce the length of his epileptic attacks.

The case before Mr Justice Iarfhlaidh O'Neill continues.


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