Adam, 17, named 55th Young Scientist winner

Adam, 17, named 55th Young Scientist winner
Adam Kelly. Photo: Chris Bellew / Fennell Photography

Adam Kelly from Skerries Community College has been named the BT Young Scientist & Technologist of the Year 2019.

Adam won for his project, which was entitled 'Optimizing The Simulation Of General Quantum Circuits'.

He has received a cheque for €7,500 for winning.

Adam will now have the chance to represent Ireland at the European Union Contest for Young Scientists in Bulgaria in September.

"I want to congratulate every student that entered, and Adam, our overall winner," said Shay Walsh, Managing Director, BT Ireland.

"His work shows terrific initiative, dedication and brilliance in tackling an immensely complex area of modern computing."

Judge and Chair of the Chemical, Physical and Mathematics Category, Professor Sean Corish, said the winning entry hugely impressed the judges.

"Quantum computing is an emerging technology which represents a potentially significant advance in computing," he said.

"Adam developed a tool to select the optimum algorithm for the simulation of particular quantum circuits, which may inform the development of a practical quantum computer, which is still at an early stage. This has implications across many areas, including cybersecurity.

"In addition, he used Open Source code to parallelise quantum simulation on graphical processing units that is significantly quicker than other available simulators and this work has already come to the attention of key industry leaders

Adam’s contributions are underpinned by a fluency in what is a highly technical and complex field which hugely impressed the judges.

The award for Group winner went to Aoife Morris and Tianha Williams, both aged 16 and transition year students from St Aloysius College Carrigtwohill, Cork.

Their project was 'Developing an organic solar cell coating solution to mitigate fossil fuels usage by motor vehicles', which develops an organic solar cell which can be used to partially power an electric car.

The students were in the Chemical, Physical & Mathematical Sciences Category at Intermediate level.

The BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition continues tomorrow and is open to the public from 9.30am – 5.30pm

More on this topic

BT Young Scientist exhibition to go virtual in 2021BT Young Scientist exhibition to go virtual in 2021

BT Young Scientist winners receive heroes' welcome as they return to CorkBT Young Scientist winners receive heroes' welcome as they return to Cork

We must harness the energy of Young Scientists to create brighter futureWe must harness the energy of Young Scientists to create brighter future

Students’ shock at Young Scientist winStudents’ shock at Young Scientist win

More in this Section

Man, 60s, killed in Tipperary hit and runMan, 60s, killed in Tipperary hit and run

July 11 bonfires set to be lit at midnightJuly 11 bonfires set to be lit at midnight

Summer Provision to be extended to primary school students with special needs Summer Provision to be extended to primary school students with special needs

Two further Covid-19 related deaths, Department of Health confirmsTwo further Covid-19 related deaths, Department of Health confirms


Lifestyle

The long-tailed tit’s nest is an architectural marvel.Richard Collins: Altruism of the long-tailed tits or not

The flight that brought us home to Ireland after our seven months sojourn in the Canary Islands (half our stay intended, half not) was the most comfortable I’ve experienced in years. With a large plane almost entirely to yourself, you could again pretend you were somebody.Damien Enright: Wonderful to see the green, green grass of home

IRISH folklore is replete with stories of priests praying for fine weather to help farmers save their crops in wet summers. However, the opposite could soon be happening when divine powers may have to be invoked to provide rain. And not just for farmers.Donal Hickey: Praying for rain — in Ireland

Geography is often the defining factor for the destiny of an island. Those islands that lie close to the shore have often been snapped up by interests on the mainland and their morphology changed to something completely different.The Islands of Ireland: Tarbert morphed onto the mainland

More From The Irish Examiner