165 sex workers availed of HSE services last year

165 sex workers availed of HSE services last year
Stock photo

One hundred and sixty-five women who work in the sex industry availed of HSE support services last year.

One hundred and sixteen victims of human trafficking were also helped by the health service in 2019.

The details have been released under the Freedom of Information Act.

The HSE’s Women’s Health Service is a sexual health and outreach support service for women and trans-women in the sex industry.

It is based in Dublin but referrals come from throughout the country.

It includes sexual-health testing, treatment and contraception, along with helping women to exit the sex industry.

One hundred and forty-eight women and 17 transgender people availed of the service last year.

There were 58 new users – up 18% on the year before.

Another part of the service is the HSE’s Anti-Human Trafficking Team, which helps people who’ve been exploited.

A total of 116 people were seen last year – 82 men, 33 women and one transgender person.

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