UK clears EU’s animal health requirements

UK clears EU’s animal health requirements

The UK has met the animal health and biosecurity assurances required for a third country to export live animals and animal products to EU member states.

Yesterday, the UK’s Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs announced this important breakthrough (which is separate from whatever tariffs on trading will be negotiated).

Without the listed status granted yesterday, exports of British animal products and most live animals to the EU could not take place, on health and biosecurity grounds.

It was granted just in time ahead of the possibility of a no-deal exit by the UK from the EU tomorrow, April 12 (when Brexit is due to take place unless the EU has granted the UK an extension to Brexit).

The UK’s listed status application approved by EU member states also means the movement of equines between the UK and the EU can also continue in a no-deal scenario.

The UK’s Food and Animal Welfare Minister David Rutley said: “This is good news for UK businesses.

“It demonstrates our very high standards of biosecurity and animal health which we will continue to maintain after we leave the EU.”

“Our top priority remains delivering a negotiated deal, but it is the job of a responsible Government to ensure we are prepared for all scenarios, including no deal.”

Listed status means the UK has passed the EU’s high criteria on biosecurity measures for animal health and food hygiene.

The UK applied for this listed status last November.

UK exports of animals and their products to the EU will need to go through an EU Border Inspection Post, and businesses will still require an Export Health Certificate (EHC). Exporters will need to follow all the EU rules for exports from non-EU countries to the EU.

If a Brexit deal is agreed, the UK will not need to be listed during the implementation period, during which common rules remain in place and businesses can trade on the same terms as available now.

The UK’s listed status will also minimise disruption for UK businesses importing live animals, germinal products, and certain animal products.

More on this topic

OBR warns no-deal Brexit could push UK economy into recessionOBR warns no-deal Brexit could push UK economy into recession

Warning economy close to overheating; think tank recommends taxing the richWarning economy close to overheating; think tank recommends taxing the rich

Michel Barnier: Theresa May never threatened no-deal Brexit at EU talksMichel Barnier: Theresa May never threatened no-deal Brexit at EU talks

Ireland not ready if UK crashes out of EU, Micheál Martin claimsIreland not ready if UK crashes out of EU, Micheál Martin claims

More in this Section

€100m worth of dangerous items in fake foods and drinks seized across Europe€100m worth of dangerous items in fake foods and drinks seized across Europe

Minister opts not to allow August road hedge cuttingMinister opts not to allow August road hedge cutting

European farmer co-ops urge AGRI to conclude CAP talks and oppose negative effects of Mercusor dealEuropean farmer co-ops urge AGRI to conclude CAP talks and oppose negative effects of Mercusor deal

Mushroom composters recognise importance of local straw supply after shortages Mushroom composters recognise importance of local straw supply after shortages


Lifestyle

Christy Collard and Robin O’Donovan are parents to six children, but sustainability is still a cornerstone of their busy lives in west Cork.The family that composts together stays together

Ron Howard was happy to let the spirit of Luciano Pavarotti shine through in his documentary on the great tenor, writes Laura Harding.Hitting the right note with new Luciano Pavarotti documentary

Prevention is so much better than cure, says Fiann Ó Nualláin, who offers gardeners timely advice on guarding face and body against those potentially damaging ultra-violet rays this season and beyond.Gardening: Be skincare-savvy for summer

It's never been more important to choose flowers and trees according to their environmental needs, says Peter DowdallIn these times of climate change, choose plants to weather all conditions

More From The Irish Examiner