Tipperary farm for sale in lots guide priced at €6,000 and €11,900 per acre

Tipperary farm for sale in lots guide priced at €6,000 and €11,900 per acre

There should be a good attendance at a public auction taking place at Cahir House Hotel in Cahir, Co Tipperary on Thursday, February 6, at 3pm.

The property going under the hammer is a 31-acre holding of good-quality land located adjacent to the village of Ardfinnan.

It’s approximately 9km south of where the auction will be taking place, and Clonmel is approximately 15km from the holding.

The selling agent is John Stokes of Clonmel-based auctioneers REA Stokes & Quirke.

“It’s divided into two separate parts,” says John.

“There’s one parcel of 21 acres and another parcel of 10 acres.”

Both parts are adjacent to the village, and are about a two-minute drive apart.

“It’s very good grazing ground. This would be good, free-draining ground, and there’s good road frontage onto secondary roads on both lots.”

Of the two parts, the larger 21-acre section (Lot 1) enjoys the better quality land.

Lot 2 is also quite good land, according to the selling agents, but is a little more hilly in character.

“The ten acres in Lot 2 is a bit more elevated on a hill and has an Advised Minimum Value of €60,000 (€6,000/acre) and the 21 acres in Lot 2 has an AMV of €250,000 (€11,900/acre).

“These lots are basically on the approach into the village,” says John.

“One is at the approach to the village from the Clonmel side.

“The other field has road frontage onto two roads on the Cahir side of Ardfinnan.”

The other string to the bow of this holding is their location.

While they are being sold purely at an agricultural level, and there is no direct evidence to suggest that any planning permission will be forthcoming, their locations will mean that the possibility of getting permission to build a single home is a real one, and that may yet play a part in determining the final value.

“It’s purely agricultural value,” confirms John, before adding: “The 21 acres of Lot 1 may have potential for one-off housing, I don’t know.”

Interest, says John, has been quite good so far.

“There have been a good few enquiries so far from locally-based farmers,” he says.

“Whoever is going to buy will be most likely using it for grazing land, in my opinion.”

There are no entitlements going with the land, because the property was let out during the relevant years.

These neatly sized and highly accessible properties will make for tempting morsels for any number of farmers who would be looking to expand their holdings, as well as for those looking to carrying out some hobby farming.

With such a wide range of interested parties likely, this brace of properties could attract a series of bids on the day.

As with all public auctions, however, it all depends on who turns up on Thursday, February 6.

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