Small but perfectly formed farms hit the market near Clonmel and Cashel

Small but perfectly formed farms hit the market near Clonmel and Cashel
Aerial view of the 32-acre stud farm for sale at Railstown, Cashel, Co Tipperary

Clonmel-based auctioneers PF Quirke & Co are currently selling two similar-sized quality roadside grass holdings in South Tipperary, each with its own characteristics to attract very different clients.

The first one is a 32-acre farm located near Cashel. Situated in the townland of Railstown, approximately 8km from Cashel, this property is in superb condition, according to the selling agents, and is located in the heart of stud-farm country.

“It was sale agreed earlier in the year,” says selling agent Pat Quirke. “It fell through because of the Covid crisis and it’s back on the market now with lots of interest in it. It has been a very active property because it’s very well developed. At a price of €600,000 (€18,750/acre), it appears a huge sum of money, but massive investment has gone into it. There are farm roadways, newly-built stone walls, post and rail, CCTV, drainage, hardcore areas, It’s ready just to put a house on it, and it’s a perfect small stud farm.”

The second property is in the townland of Kilmalogue, close to the town of Clonmel. It is a non-residential 33.5-acre holding.

“This is very much a farmer’s farm,” says Pat. "It’s all in grass at the minute – excellent quality land and there’s tillage land all around it. It’s in a good area on the outskirts of Clonmel so if someone wanted to have a farm and build a house there, I think that there would probably be no difficulty.”

There has been a strong level of enquiries on the property so far, Pat says. “I’d see it as a property that there will be sufficient demand for, and it should get sold.”

The asking price for this farm is €570,000. At €17,000 per acre, it’s a marginally less expensive prospect on paper but, as with the other holding, top quality land in South Tipperary does not come cheap.

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