Sale of non-residential farm near Bandon with excellent road access

Sale of non-residential farm near Bandon with excellent road  access
The farmyard on the 47-acre non-residential land parcel for sale at Laragh, Bandon, Co Cork.

The rich and fertile lands in the vicinity of Bandon, West Cork’s premier market town, are always in demand, and generally fetch a good price when presented to the market.

Clonakilty-based auctioneers Hodnett-Forde are currently selling a 47-acre non-residential holding just 4km from the Bandon town centre, in the townland of Laragh.

The property consists of good land, according to the selling agent Ernest Forde, who says interest is expected to be strong.

“It’s a decent block of land,” says Ernest, “and it has been rented out for a number of years. Not only is it very good quality land, but it’s also sheltered.”

The holding is in one block, and enjoys excellent access, with road frontage on two sides, and the River Brinny abutting the property on its northern boundary.

The farm is non-residential but it does have a good collection of outbuildings. These include a three-bay round roof shed, with a lean-to structure on either side, incorporating a slatted floor and loose lying/storage area, as well as an open slurry pit.

“The buildings would need a bit of work on them at this stage,” says Ernest.

“They’re okay but for modern-day farming, they would need to be revamped.”

Interestingly, the land is being put to a variety of uses, and has sections of both dairy farming and tillage.

“There’s some of it in beet at the moment,” says Ernest, “and some in barley. This land would be suitable for anything, really.”

Demand for good land in this part of the world has been consistently strong, and the same agents sold a quantity of similar-quality land last year.

“It was just down the road in Carhue, Bandon,” says Ernest. “It made just under €13,500/ acre at the time.”

The price guide on this farm is €12,500 per acre, but the selling agents are expecting that it will go higher than that: “We would expect so. It’s not land that floods, so that should be an advantage to it.”

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